EU Networks

There are a number of European networks in the field of radicalization and violence prevention. The European Union has promoted and supported networking, exchange, research and training programs to actively and effectively counteract forms of violent radicalism. Here you will find a selection of these projects.

Radicalization Prevention in Prisons

Radicalization Prevention in Prisons

Prisons are often described as “breeding grounds” for radicalization and violent extremism, since they are highly unsettling environments in which individuals are more likely than elsewhere to explore new beliefs and associations. Deprived of their existing social networks and given the conditions of their confinement, prisoners with no previous involvement in politically motivated violence are vulnerable to being radicalised and recruited into terrorism. While the extent of the problem remains unclear, the potential for prison radicalisation is significant, and the issue clearly needs to be addressed.

A key driver of radicalization prevention in prisons is the training and awareness raising of the staff. First line workers have been identified as a key group that can make an important contribution to this issue and include prison and probation staff.

Specific goals include:

  • Create awareness on the broad picture of terrorism, the mind set and narratives used by understanding a) why prisons are a breeding ground for radicalisation; b) the difference between conversion, radicalisation and moving to extremist views (terminology); c) the pathways and levels of radicalisation, role in the network; d) recruitment tactics employed within the prison environment; and e) indicators on how to identify vulnerable people at risk of radicalisation;
  • Develop the tools and instruments for prison administration and line-level staff to recognize signs of radicalisation at an early stage within their specific facility;
  • Provide common, consistent and effective instruments to help staff report their observations to the appropriate intelligence staff;
  • Provide model procedures for intelligence staff to vet the data they receive from prison staff and to appropriately interpret it;
  • Establish a series of training programmes and tools for all staff within a prison to respond appropriately to potential vulnerable individuals at risk of radicalisation.

The project's target group is composed of 180 prison professionals from 5 different countries (Portugal, Norway, Turkey, Belgium and Romania) which will undergo a training programme with 5 components and 160 sessions of 3 hours per course: class, online, short-term staff training, work-based assignments and coaching/consultancy.

website
http://www.ubi.pt/

mail / contact: -

Youth Counselling against Radicalisation – a Holistic Approach to Support Vulnerable Adolescents

Youth Counselling against Radicalisation – a Holistic Approach to Support Vulnerable Adolescents

For a critical minority of young people, adolescence is a time when serious problems emerge or earlier difficulties escalate. They may have difficulties at school, lack good role models or the resilience to deal with new pressures. They may be confronted with alienation from and experience discrimimation and open or hidden racism. Since they do not see positive perspectives, a rsising number is attracted by extremist ideologies, such as Neo-Nazi groups or the „Islamic State“.

The Radicalisation Awareness Network of the European Commission states that „the best prevention is to stop people from getting involved in violent extremist or terrorist activities in the first place, or to convince them to turn away from such ideas and methods.... The people best placed to tackle the phenomenon of radicalisation are people in direct contact with targeted individuals or vulnerable groups of population.“ We must help young people to stay on track – by improving the support and opportunities available. The project’s aim is to help young people to stay on track by improving the counselling support. YCARE shares existing knowledge about radicalisation that might be relevant for youth counsellors around Europe. Our products are relevant for all professionals working with young people who are vulnerable to radicalisation, or who have already been radicalised.The main products are:

Guidelines, a framework for counsellors to inform about targeted youth support to help vulnerable young people early to address their dfficulties as soon as possible and to prevent their problems escalating, in order to prevent them from being drawn to into anti-social behaviour, crime or joining terrorist organisations and movements

Best Practice Toolbox, offering a modular range of awareness raising, training and demonstration materials for youth counsellors, trainers as well as other professionals working in the field of youth counselling, based on latest positive psychology research findings, particularly the use of new didactic tools combating problems such as radicalisation

Online Platform and Mobile Applications, supporting the delivery of the all outputs of the project and providing new means of interaction between learners and trainers, as it supports electronic management, storage and presentation of materials, transcending limitations of space and time and creating the necessary conditions for a dynamic teaching environment.

More than 300 professionals filled in the questionnaire. Another 300 professionals participated in the Multiplier-events. More impact is expected in the near future, since we reached all kind of intermediar organisations who can and will spread the tools in their regular activities.

website:
http://www.ycare.eu

mail / contact:
Fdemeere@verwey-jonker.nl

TERRA - Terrorism & Radicalisation / Prevention, De-Radicalisation and Citizenship

TERRA - Terrorism & Radicalisation / Prevention, De-Radicalisation and Citizenship

This project is composed of a European network-based prevention and learning program.

TERRA is a European project supported by the European Commission DG Home Affairs.

The objective of TERRA is to reinforce the positive role victims and former terrorists can play in relation to the prevention of radicalisation and providing practical guidance to specific target groups. Target groups and beneficiaries include victims, (potential) terrorists, EU member states and frontline-workers in the field of law-enforcement, rehabilitation, teaching, welfare and social workers, journalists, policy makers, and religious leaders.

TERRA stimulates knowledge synthesis and exchange throughout the European Union, between groups and between member states. The project builds on the work of the Network of Victims of Terrorism (NAVT) and is complementary to and provides input for the Radicalization Awareness Network (RAN) as a 'network of networks'.

A broad platform will be realized to exchange available materials, lessons and experiences between all member states, and to provide practical tools, advice and policy input.

Results of the project will be:

  • Network coverage in all member states (in close cooperation with the Network of Associations of Victims of Terrorism NAVT and the Radicalization Awareness Network RAN).
  • Overview and description of methods and approaches for instance, to screen victims, recognize signs of radicalisation and advice to enhance the rehabilitation of terrorists.
  • Manual with recommendations for a broad group of front-liners: teachers, prison warders, policemen, social and youth workers, journalists and policy makers.
  • Guidance for journalists and policy makers
  • Education packages for schools.

website:
http://www.terra-net.eu

mail / contact:
M.ROOZE@IMPACT.ARQ.ORG

EU TERRA / Impact
Nienoord 5
1112 XE Diemen
The Netherlands

Council of Europe Counter-Terrorism Committee (CDCT).

Council of Europe Counter-Terrorism Committee (CDCT).

The Council of Europe Counter-Terrorism Committee (CDCT), formerly called the Committee of Experts on Terrorism (CODEXTER), is an intergovernmental body coordinating the Council of Europe's action against terrorism.
Based on the principles of prevent, prosecute and protect, the CDCT is tasked with developing appropriate and practical soft law instruments such as recommendations and guidelines for member States to consider and apply in the fight against terrorist activity.

For 2018 and 2019, some of the CDCT’s main priorities are:
Developing a Council of Europe Counter-Terrorism Strategy 2018-2022;
Examining the feasibility of agreeing to a pan-European legal definition of “terrorism” for the 2005 Warsaw Convention;
Addressing the phenomena of foreign terrorist fighters and returnees;
The use and abuse of the internet by terrorists;
The roles of women and children in terrorism; links between terrorism and organised crime (to be addressed in cooperation with the European Committee on Crime Problems (CDPC));

The CDCT also provides a platform for country profiles on legislative and institutional counter-terrorism situation in member States, and helps exchange best practices and promote the effective implementation of Council of Europe instruments applicable to the fight against terrorism. Additionally, to help ensure that all member State efforts to combat terrorism in full respect of human rights and the rule of law, the CDCT and the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) provide a regularly-updated factsheet on ECHR cases relating to counter-terrorism.

website:
https://www.coe.int/en/web/counter-terrorism/cdct

mail / contact:
https://www.coe.int/en/web/counter-terrorism/contact-us

Committee of Experts on Terrorism (2003-2017)

Committee of Experts on Terrorism (2003-2017)

The Committee of Experts on Terrorism (CODEXTER) was an intergovernmental body coordinating the Council of Europe's action against terrorism. It drafted the Council of Europe Convention on the Prevention of Terrorism and a number of important soft law instruments.

CODEXTER was focusing on:

  • terrorism and the internet;
  • radicalisation leading to terrorism and receiving of training for terrorism, including via the Internet;
  • special investigation techniques;
  • assessment of possible gaps in the legal framework provided by the Council of Europe international legal instruments in the area of the prevention and suppression of terrorism, including with respect to Interantional Humanitarian Law and terrorism and also in relation to the absence of a common definition of 'terrorism' in International law
  • links between terrosim and organised crime (to be addressed in cooperation with the CDPC).

Other work of CODEXTER included country profiles on legislative and institutional counter-terrorism capacity, monitoring the signatures and ratifications and promoting the effective implementation of the Council of Europe instruments applicable to the fight against terrorism, in particular the Convention on the Prevention of Terrorism (CETS No.196), exchange of best practices of combating terrorism while fully respecting human rights and the rule of law, and preparation of the database of the European Court on Human Rights cases related to counter-terrorism.

CODEXTER worked in close cooperation with international bodies, such as the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED), the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the European Union, and the Global Counter-Terrorism Forum. In 2018 CODEXTER became the Council of Europe Counter-Terrorism Committee (CDCT).

website:
https://www.coe.int/en/web/counter-terrorism/codexter

mail / contact:
https://www.coe.int/en/web/counter-terrorism/contact-u

The Global Counterterrorism Forum (GCTF)

The Global Counterterrorism Forum (GCTF)

GCTF is an international forum of 29 countries and the European Union with an overarching mission of reducing the vulnerability of people worldwide to terrorism by preventing, combating, and prosecuting terrorism.

Our forum brings together experts and practitioners from countries and regions around the world to share experiences and expertise, and develop tools and strategies on how to counter the evolving terrorist threat. Launched in 2011, the GCTF is an informal, a-political, multilateral counterterrorism (CT) platform that has strengthened the international architecture for addressing 21st century terrorism. Central to the Forum’s overarching mission is the promotion of a strategic, long-term approach to counter terrorism and the violent extremist ideologies that underpin it. The GCTF develops Good Practices and tools for policy-makers and practitioners to strengthen CT civilian capabilities, national strategies, action plans and training modules. It provides a forum for national CT officials and practitioners to meet with their counterparts from different regions to share experiences, expertise, strategies, tools, capacity needs, and capacity-building programs.

One of the important goals of the Forum is to support and catalyze implementation of the United Nations (UN) Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, reviewed in June 2016, and the UN CT Framework more broadly, including for instance the UN Secretary-General’s Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism presented to the UN General Assembly in January 2016. In pursuance of this goal, the GCTF works closely with UN bodies.

website:
https://www.thegctf.org/

mail / contact:
adminunit@theGCTF.org

Scientific Approach to Finding Indicators of and REsponses to Radicalisation(SAFIRE)

Scientific Approach to Finding Indicators of and REsponses to Radicalisation(SAFIRE)

Background: SAFIRE (Scientific Approach to Finding Indicators for and Responses to Radicalisation) was an EU project from June 2010 through November 2013 that supported the policy making process with tools designed to identify key dimensions and determinants of radicalisation and to visualise relationships between them.

The scope of SAFIRE primarily involved groups and individuals on the extreme and violent end of the radicalisation spectrum. However, in order to understand them and their motives, the researchers also needed to step back and understand what happened before those individuals turned to a more violent version of their philosophy.

The project focused on two innovations in this field of research:

Developing a non-linear model of the radicalisation process based on typologies of radical groups, cultural aspects of radicalisation, observable indicators of radicalisation, interventions designed to reverse, halt or prevent the radicalisation process.

The collection of qualitative and quantitative empirical data to test hypotheses about radicalisation and principles of effective interventions.

website:
https://www.rand.org/randeurope/research/projects/safire-radicalisation.html

mail / contact: -

Community Counteracting Radicalisation

Community Counteracting Radicalisation

Throughout Europe we can observe an increased preparedness to prevent and counteract young people´s radicalisation towards violent and militant extremism. However, in previous efforts, there seems to be skepticism about the involvement of local communities and civil society resources in the activities. The CoCoRa project therefore aims to develop a prevention strategy in close collaboration with local communities that may be targeted by violent extremists.

website:
http://cocoraproject.eu/

mail / contact: -

Youth Work Against Violent Radicalisation

Youth Work Against Violent Radicalisation

In order to determine and illustrate the role of youth work in prevention of radicalisation leading to violence, four SALTO Resource Centers together with several National Agencies of Erasmus+: Youth in Action and the EU-CoE Youth Partnership have come together to research the phenomena and work on a strategy supporting youth workers in this field.

website:
https://www.salto-youth.net/about/regionalcooperation/current/againstviolentradicalisation/

mail / contact: -

The CONCORDIA project

The CONCORDIA project

Harnessing the power of digital media tools to prevent the radicalisation of vulnerable youth

In Europe today there are a wide range of situations and circumstances where extremist narratives have emerged as powerful and destructive tools used by religious fanatics, terrorists and those espousing radical political views to radicalize vulnerable youth. Indeed, it is clear that the range of situations and circumstances where radicalization can occur increases with every economic downturn; every incident of racial hatred or homophobic abuse; every new migrant or refugee crisis.

The CONCORDIA Project consortium comprises 8 partners representing 8 Member States. It is led by Jugendförderverein Parchim/Lübz e.V. from Germany who are supported by Asociatia pentru Educatie si Dezvoltare Durabila from Romania; Die Kärntner Volkshochschulen from Austria; Centrum inspirace from the Czech Republic; Future In Perspective from Ireland; Etudes Et Chantiers Corsica from France; SYNTHESIS Centre for Research and Education from Cyprus and Innoventum Oy from Finland.

While it is widely accepted that teenage years can be a particularly hard time for some young people in the vast majority of cases issues that arise are of a transient nature and the young people in question with appropriate supports successfully negotiate the pitfalls. For a small minority these challenges persist and are often further exacerbated by a lack of positive role models and feelings of alienation from their peer group. For this cohort of vulnerable youth the path to an inclusive and rewarding life can be somewhat obscured. Educational under-achievement most often leads to social exclusion and multi-faceted disadvantage and in a small number of cases young adolescents on the margins of society and economy are being attracted to extremist groups enticed by the false promises of Neo-Nazi or “Islamic State” ideologies.

website:
https://www.concordia.website/en/home/

mail / contact: -

VETcontra

VETcontra

Vocational schools, secondary schools and vocational training institutions are often confronted with learners coming from different social, cultural or racial backgrounds. Under these circumstances, it happens often that frictions arise that are born out of prejudice, low self esteem and latent xenophobia. When such problems emerge and difficulties escalate, and when young people do not see positive perspectives, a critical minority, but in rising numbers, is attracted by extremist ideologies, such as Neo-Nazi groups or the djihadist movement of the „Islamic State“.

The Radicalisation Awareness Network of the European Commission states that „the best prevention is to stop people from getting involved in violent extremist or terrorist activities in the first place, or to convince them to turn away from such ideas and methods…. The people best placed to tackle the phenomenon of radicalisation are the so called first-liners – people in direct contact with targeted individuals or vulnerable groups of population.“

Teachers and trainers – the called „first-liners“ above – need therefore new skills and competences to be better prepared to deal with intercultural tensions between diverse groups of learners and detect, at an early stage, indicators of radicalisation among their learners. We will raise their awareness and identify initiatives, best practice examples and tools that help them do their work better, to find out who is at risk and the best way of helping people who need support. What tools

and methods are available and most effective to provide this support? Who has undergone traumatic experience and shows a behaviour that is a consequence of post-traumatic stress disorder? How can a teacher detect such symptoms?

Our project will provide vocational teachers and trainers with information and best practice about effective tools and methods, in order to help them do their work better. They will be able to acquire skills and knowledge to apply interventions in a preventive stage, and to focus on self-esteem, empathy towards out-groups and managing negative emotions. In the long run, this approach will lead to a better learning climate, better learning results and will reduce racism and xenophobia in the classroom.

website:
https://www.vetcontra.eu/

mail / contact:
E-C-C Association for Interdisciplinary Education and Consulting
Education – Culture – Citizenship
Kreuttal 6
2112 Würnitz

Allo-Tolerance

Allo-Tolerance

Nine educational organisations across Europe have joined their experience against hate to develop tolerance and prevent violent radicalisations. We want to share ideas, strategies and tools for teachers, trainers and educators.

website:
www.allo-tolerance.eu

mail / contact:
https://www.allo-tolerance.eu/en/contact

Counter Extremism Project (CEP)

Counter Extremism Project (CEP)

The Counter Extremism Project will expose the architecture of support for extremist groups and their ideology and combat their spread by pressuring their financial support networks, countering the narrative of extremists and their online recruitment, and advocating for strong laws, policies and regulations.

The Counter Extremism Project will:

  • Expose, degrade, and stop the financing and other economic support of global extremist organizations;
  • Build a best-in-class clearinghouse and database of extremist groups and their supporters, mapping the social and financial networks, tools and methodologies on which these groups rely.
  • Assemble a global network of experts to promote our collective security, and the universal values and interests that are threatened by extremist ideology, recruitment, and practices.
  • Oppose the spread of extremist ideology by advancing compelling counter narratives, and by stemming the recruitment of support as these groups take advantage of at-risk communities, and youth to promote their ideology and power.
  • By employing these tools we will join the fight against extremism, build support for the fight around the world and serve as resource for governments, the media, NGO’s, academia, businesses and the public.

Website
https://www.counterextremism.com/countries/belgium

E-mail / Contact / telephone
https://www.counterextremism.com/contact-us

Group of Friends of Preventing Violent Extremism

Group of Friends of Preventing Violent Extremism

The objective of the Group (Jordan, Norway, Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, European Union, Finland, France, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Iraq, Italy, Kenya, Lebanon, Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, Poland, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Saudi Arabia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, Turkey, The United Arab Emirates, The United Kingdom, The United States) is to:

  • Raise awareness of the need to address the underlying conditions conducive to the spread of violent extremism and terrorism.
    Promote institutionalization of Preventing Violent Extremism across the UN system, including through coordination and cooperation between UN security, development, educational, and other relevant entities in the field and at headquarters (“One UN”).
  • Provide political support to efforts by the Office of Counter-Terrorism (UNOCT), the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED) and other Counter-Terrorism entities of the UN to prevent violent extremism as part of a balanced implementation of the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy.
  • Share lessons learned and best practices around various topics pertaining to Preventing Violent Extremism such as the importance of good governance, human rights, gender equality, women’s and youth engagement, education, development, and rehabilitation and reintegration strategies.
  • Support local, community-level initiatives aimed at strengthening resilience against violent extremism.
  • Share best practices related to the development of national strategies, expertise, and tools to effectively prevent violent extremism.
  • Provide a forum for discussion and coordination between UN entities, governments, civil society, and other stakeholders to ensure streamlined and non-duplicative efforts against violent extremism.
  • Highlight the importance of the full and effective participation of women and youth in efforts to prevent violent extremism.

Website:
https://www.norway.no/en/missions/un/news/news-from-norwayun/PVE/

E-mail / Contact / telephone:
delun@mfa.no

Strong cities Network

Strong cities Network

Facilitate systematic sharing of knowledge, expertise and lessons learned on building social cohesion and community resilience to prevent violent extremism across cities on an international basis, through both regional workshops and international conferences.

Raise awareness of existing policy, programming, and practice through a dynamic and searchable ‘Online Information Hub’, providing an extensive library of existing local approaches and responses to prevent violent extremism.

Directly support cities to develop strategic frameworks and capabilities to build resilience that safeguard the rights of their local communities, including through capacity building seminars and interactive training modules on themes of mutual interest.

Directly seed the development of new and innovative projects through ‘Local Innovation Grants’, providing support for cities on innovative project development and support for the transfer of promising projects that could be adapted across different locations.

Directly support cities to develop strategic frameworks and capabilities to build resilience that safeguard the rights of their local communities, including through capacity building seminars and interactive training modules on themes of mutual interest.

Provide a global platform to enable cities to jointly voice their needs and those of their communities, to inform national and international decision-making on preventing the spread and growth of violent extremism.

Website
http://strongcitiesnetwork.org/

E-mail / Contact / telephone
http://strongcitiesnetwork.org/contact/

Prevention of juvenile radicalisation (PRALT)

Prevention of juvenile radicalisation (PRALT)

As the European agenda entails, the issue of radicalisation and countering violent extremism has increasingly become a priority for every European Union (EU) Member State. The radicalisation of EU citizens, which may go as far as their departure to fight for terrorist and extreme violent organisations such as IS, poses a genuine security threat to the European Union, its member states and neighbouring countries.

The quickening pace of this phenomenon means that repressive measures are no longer sufficient and that a new strategy based on prevention needs to be adopted.

The project “The prevention of juvenile radicalisation: Promoting the use of alternatives to detention through judicial training” will address the issue of juvenile radicalisation in detention, within and outside the prison system, through the sharing of knowledge and good practices between judicial professionals and actors of several EU Member States (EUMS), especially those drawing on cross-sector collaboration. It is based on the assumption that efforts to promote disengagement from violence and extremism will be more effective if they build on existing structures for crime prevention and rehabilitation.

The activities proposed in this project, and especially the training programme, will therefore target in priority the judiciary and judicial staff: judges, prosecutors and court officers, as well as other legal practitioners and actors involved in the justice system: lawyers, probation officers, educators, mediators and policymakers, as being the group most susceptible of benefiting of, and implementing, knowledge and good practices shared and learnt through the project.

The project will be focused on the three following themes:

The prevention of radicalisation in detention.
Tertiary prevention and reinsertion.
De-radicalisation processes through alternatives to detention, including community and family based approaches to de-radicalisation.

Website
http://www.oijj.org/en/prevention-juvenile-radicalisation-introduction

E-mail / Contact / telephone -

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and Terrorism Prevention

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and Terrorism Prevention

Terrorism continues to pose a major threat to international peace and security and undermines the core values of the United Nations. In addition to the devastating human cost of terrorism, in terms of lives lost or permanently altered, terrorist acts aim to destabilize governments and undermine economic and social development. Addressing this threat is that much more difficult given the complex and constantly evolving nature of terrorist activity. Its motivations, financing, methods of attack and choice of target are constantly changing. Terrorist acts often defy national borders; one act of terrorism can involve activities and actors from numerous countries. Given this complexity, strong coordination and cooperation within national governments and between states and organizations at the regional and international level is essential to effectively combat terrorism, to share best practices and lessons learned and to assist with the investigation and prosecution of terrorism cases.

In response to this threat, gradually over five decades of work, the international community has developed a common universal legal framework against terrorism. This framework is comprised of the 19 universal legal instruments against terrorism along with the relevant United Nations Security Council Resolutions. The implementation of these conventions, protocols and resolutions is informed by the guidance provided by the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy along with United Nations General Assembly Resolutions.

The Terrorism Prevention Branch (TPB) of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has a specific role to play in these international efforts. For over a decade, TPB has been the key United Nations entity providing legal counter-terrorism technical assistance to Member States. As mandated by the United Nations General Assembly, TPB works to assist Member States, upon request, with the ratification, legislative incorporation and implementation of the universal legal framework against terrorism.

Within the United Nations system, UNODC possesses significant comparative advantages for offering a comprehensive response to terrorism. In particular, it combines a range of expertise in the related areas of crime prevention and criminal justice, rule of law, drug control, transnational organized crime, money-laundering, corruption and related international cooperation in criminal matters with operational field-level capacity.

Website
https://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/terrorism/index.html

E-mail / Contact / telephone
https://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/contact-us.html

IMPACT EUROPE

IMPACT EUROPE

Tackling terrorism and violent radicalisation have been a top priority for European Union (EU) Member States ever since the 9/11 attacks and the Madrid and London bombings in 2004 and 2005 respectively. While EU Member States were initially almost exclusively concerned with Islamist radicalisation, more recently, EU Member States’ perspective on the threat posed by radicalisation has come to also focus again on the more traditional threats emanating from right- and left-wing extremists as well as nationalist-separatists.

Indeed, over the past decade, hundreds of millions of euros have been invested in counter-terrorism policies and interventions across Europe, and yet practitioners within Member States often still find it challenging to measure the effectiveness of their counter terrorism work and to learn from it. Accordingly, a key priority of the EU’s counter-terrorism strategy is to look systematically at Member States’ experiences, not only internally but also in third countries, at lessons learned, good practices, unsuccessful practices, and analyse why certain approaches have succeeded or not, in order to develop expertise on what makes for successful interventions.

In an attempt to contribute to the ongoing efforts within Europe to establish what works in tackling violent radicalisation, IMPACT Europe aims to help evaluators, policy-makers, frontline workers and academics working in the field of violent radicalisation to answer three questions, namely: How effective are various programmes at tackling violent radicalisation? What is promising practice in tackling violent radicalisation? How does this inform our knowledge and understanding of violent radicalisation?

Specifically, IMPACT Europe is developing an evaluation toolkit that draws on a state-of-the-art knowledge database on radicalisation factors, existing counter violent radicalisation interventions, and approaches to evaluating these interventions. Making the database easily accessible to a wide range of public and voluntary sector users, the toolkit is ultimately geared at encouraging practitioners to properly evaluate their counter violent radicalisation activities and to build good practices into the design of any future interventions.

Website
http://impacteurope.eu/about-us/

E-mail / Contact / telephone
http://impacteurope.eu/contact/

CHRISCountering Human RADICALISATION In School

CHRISCountering Human RADICALISATION In School

“Prevention is key: it is crucial to invest in interventions that are aimed at removing the breeding ground for radicalisation to prevent these processes or stop them as early as possible.”RAN CollectionPreventing Radicalisation to Terrorism and Violent Extremism(EU Commission, 2016)State of the art knowledge and practical experience on radicalisation prevention in schools is excellently collated and summarized in the 2016 EU Commission publication “Preventing Radicalisation to Terrorism and Violent Extremism”, produced by the Commission’s Radicalisation Awareness Network.The CHRIS project is guided and directed by this publication, which is demonstrated across the application.The CHRIS project is one of the first projects in Europe to take the Commission’s Young People’s Co-creation Agenda seriously and to implement this Agenda to create valuable contributions to radicalisation prevention in schools, based on the full, authentic and uncompromised co-creation of young students from a diversity of European countries.The CHRIS approach is guided by the fact that young people’s co-creation is a SINE QUA NON for efficient and future-oriented radicalisation strategies in European schools.The CHRIS project is embedded in a long-term European strategy: The “CHRIS Schools” project will be followed and complemented by a “CHRIS Community” project submitted to the October 2016 Erasmus+ Youth Call and addressing radicalisation prevention in community contexts.The wider perspective is a Knowledge Alliance application to be submitted in 2017 or 2018, bringing together powerful radicalisation prevention resources.The CHRIS project will involve young students in basic schooling in the development of sustainable ways of countering radicalisation in schools, based on in-depths engagement in what produces radicalisation potential in relation to teenage identity formation and through real-life and real-time community collaboration – and with the aim to build capacity to co-create the project outcomes.The CHRIS project will take radicalisation prevention in schools to a didactic level and mobilize young students’ hidden and unfolded knowledge to do so.Therefore the project will take the participating young student teams through 3 phases of capacity building and co-creation: Feeling Me Feeling School (identity), Open Schooling (reality and community) and Co-creation (design of radicalisation prevention in schools).The project will build capacity and in particular critical capacity among the young students to be co-creating the project results, including through virtual collaboration between the students from the pan-EU partnership and climaxing the collaboration through a 5 days intensive mobility event, the CHRIS Co-creation Encounter.The project will move radicalisation prevention beyond delivery of content and beyond punctual and event-based interventions and towards a didactic level: countering the development of early radicalisation potential through offering young people solid life-wide narratives, (gender) identities and missions, including empowering to political narratives and identities.

Website
https://chris-erasmusplus.eu/

E-mail / Contact / telephone
https://chris-erasmusplus.eu/contact.html

PREVENT RADICALISATION - SUPPORTS FOR PROFESSIONALS IN THEIR WORK WITH REFUGEES AND MIGRANTS

PREVENT RADICALISATION - SUPPORTS FOR PROFESSIONALS IN THEIR WORK WITH REFUGEES AND MIGRANTS

People working with refugees, asylum seekers and migrants are Often faced with Tensions Within and between groups of refugees. In some cases, they are faced with radicalization signals.

The Prevent project Focuses on Best Practices Implemented in Europe to prepare humanitarian workers to address These issues.

Website
http://preventproject.libereta-fvg.it/

E-mail / Contact / telephone
http://preventproject.libereta-fvg.it/contacts/

PRIME (Preventing, Interdicting and Mitigating Extremism)

PRIME (Preventing, Interdicting and Mitigating Extremism)

The EU-funded PRIME Project aims to improve our understanding of lone actor terrorism and to inform the design of social and physical counter-measures for the prevention of lone-actor radicalisation, the disruption of lone-actor terrorist plots, and the mitigation of terrorist attacks carried out by lone extremists.

In this endeavour, PRIME adopts an innovative multidisciplinary approach, which combines formal modelling techniques drawn from security engineering with expertise from the ecological, social, behavioural and criminological sciences. The end-product will be a decision-support tool for end-users whose remit is to deal with the lone actor terrorism threat at the local, national or international level.

PRIME is keen to involve end-users and subject matter experts at every stage of the project. If you would like to take part in our validation activities or be kept appraised of our findings, do not hesitate to contact us.

Website
http://www.fp7-prime.eu/home_page

E-mail / Contact / telephone
http://www.fp7-prime.eu/contacts_page

DARE (Dialogue about Radicalisation and Equality)

DARE (Dialogue about Radicalisation and Equality)

The DARE (Dialogue about Radicalisation and Equality) project includes 15 partners in 13 countries - Belgium, Croatia, France, Germany, Greece, Malta, Norway, Poland, Russian Federation, The Netherlands, Tunisia, Turkey and the UK - and will run for four years. Funded under the EU Horizon 2020 Framework Programme, it will investigate young people’s encounters with and agents of radicalisation, how they receive and respond to those calls, and how they make choices about the paths they take.

It aims to broaden understanding of radicalisation, demonstrate that it is not located in any one religion or community, and to explore the effects of radicalisation on society. DARE will focus on people aged between 12 and 30, as they are a key target of recruiters and existing research suggests they may be particularly receptive to radicalism. It will approach young people neither as victims nor perpetrators of radicalisation, but as engaged, reflexive, often passionate social actors who seek information they can trust, as they navigate a world in which calls to radicalisation are numerous.

Website
http://www.dare-h2020.org/

E-mail / Contact / telephone
http://www.dare-h2020.org/contact.html

mindb4act.eu

mindb4act.eu

Developing skills and building a community of practice for innovative, ethical and effective actions against violent extremism

The issue of radicalization leading to terrorism has become a crucial part of the political and academic agendas in Europe, confronted, especially in the last decade, not only to the threat from Jihadist terrorism but also with right/left wing violent extremism. Though violent radicalization is not a new phenomenon, its most recent manifestations require a more comprehensive and holistic approach addressing not only security concerns but also framing of the problem in social and psychological terms.

MINDb4ACT tries to solve limitations in conventional research methodologies through the Living Labs framework in which all stakeholders –academia, Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs), private sector, governments, municipalities, first-line respondents and other practitioners– collaborate to co-design new practices to prevent violent extremisms addressing all dimension (security, political, societal and ethical).

Website
https://mindb4act.eu/

E-mail / Contact / telephone
https://mindb4act.eu/contact/

Radicalisation Prevention in Prisons (R2PRIS)

Radicalisation Prevention in Prisons (R2PRIS)

Radicalisation Prevention in Prisons (R2PRIS) project seeks to reduce radicalisation and extremism inside prisons by enhancing the competences of frontline staff (correctional officers, educational staff, and psychologists, social workers) to identify, report and interpret signals of radicalisation and respond appropriately. Bringing together international experts in the field of radicalisation and national prison administrations, the R2PRIS project aims to offer an innovative training programme for prison staff on how to recognise and prevent the process of radicalisation inside prisons.

Website
http://www.r2pris.org/

E-mail / Contact / telephone
R2PRIS project promoter:
BSAFE LAB law enforcement,
justice and public safety research and technology transfer lab Beira Interior
University Portugal

www.bsafe-lab.org

www.ubi.pt

Contact: Nuno Garcia

Project RAN – Radicalisation Awarness Network (EU)

Project RAN – Radicalisation Awarness Network (EU)

Fighting terrorism and violent extremism involves more than surveillance and security.
The Radicalisation Awareness Network (RAN) brings together practitioners from around Europe working on the prevention of radicalisation.

Website:
https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/networks/radicalisation_awareness_network_en

Contact:
Coordination: RadarEurope | a subsidiary of the RadarGroup

Veemarkt 83 1019 DB Amsterdam The Netherlands
T: +31 (0)20 463 50 50

RAN@radaradvies.nl

Links:
https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/networks/radicalisation_awareness_network/ran-best-practices/docs/ran_collection-approaches_and_practices_en.pdf